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The University of Chicago Cultural Policy Center

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Curriculum

Greg Surh, MAPH'13

Architectural History Tour Guide
Chicago Detours

Jane Hanna

"The guidance I received from Betty Farrell and the CPC allowed me to not only cultivate my academic curiosity but also prepared me to professionally apply these interests in meaningful and relevant ways."
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Kate Grogan, MAPH'11

Institutional Relations Associate
Chicago Shakespeare Theater

Kate Grogan

"I am amazed now by the access I was given to prominent stakeholders in the arts. The same people whom I now address in grant proposals, I heard speak in Cultural Policy workshops."
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Jane Hanna, MAPH'11

Social Media Strategist
Field Museum of Natural History

Jane Hanna

"The connections I was able to make to various movers and shakers in the Chicago cultural field have been absolutely invaluable."
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Jennifer Novak-Leonard, MPP'04

Senior Consultant
WolfBrown

Jennifer Novak-Leonard

"These opportunities propelled my knowledge of the most cutting-edge thinking in the field and built the foundation of my professional network."
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David Beeman, MPP'04

Corporate Counsel, Intellectual Property
Groupon, Inc.

David Beeman

"My research at the CPC helped me place intellectual property in context, how the law functions as both a form of culture itself and a mechanism for owning and controlling cultural expression."
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As the hub for cultural policy studies and research at the University of Chicago, the Cultural Policy Center educates emerging policymakers, cultural practitioners, and scholars. Our interdisciplinary curriculum draws on public policy studies, the humanities, and the social sciences.

In addition to our course offerings, our weekly workshops provide a forum for graduate students to meet visiting scholars and practitioners and to present their own research, and our conferences and guest speakers provide a real-world view of the sector.


Concentrations in cultural policy studies

The Cultural Policy Center does not grant degrees or accept applications for admission. Rather, our courses provide the option of a cultural policy concentration within the University of Chicago’s Master of Arts Program in the Humanities ("MAPH"). Students in other master's programs such as the Master of Public Policy program at the Harris School of Public Policy Studies and the Master of Arts Program in the Social Sciences also can build courses of study in cultural policy within the guidelines of their specific programs, and through consultations with their advisors and with faculty affiliated with the Cultural Policy Center.

A concentration in cultural policy studies is of particular interest to:

  • Those seeking careers in public service agencies within the cultural sector, such as foundations or government agencies that support the arts
  • Current and emerging leaders of cultural organizations seeking greater understanding of policy issues that confront the sector
  • Students seeking to pursue doctoral work with a focus on the policy dimensions of cultural studies, cultural theory, or cultural history

Through a cultural policy concentration, students are introduced to the conceptual frameworks required for cultural policy research, as well as with data sources and other tools commonly used by researchers. They gain an understanding of the features of the cultural sector and the issues it faces, including the structure and dynamics of cultural organizations, funding processes, legal issues such as intellectual property rights and censorship, and changing audiences, among other issues.

The MAPH option requires an introductory course, a research project-based course, and at least two cultural policy-related electives, as well as the Foundations of Interpretive Theory course (the "Core" course) required of all MAPH students and a final thesis on a topic broadly related to cultural policy studies. View our list of course descriptions.

Example thesis titles:

  • New Technologies: New Ways of Seeing; Smartphone Apps, Art Museums, and Spectatorship
  • Curating for Ghosts: The Effects of Foundation and Corporate Philanthropy on the Arts
  • The Right to Virtual Heritage
  • Clueless in Chicago: Grassroots Art Worlds and Cultural Policy
  • Third Place Creation Through Historic Preservation: Antiquated Buildings, Antiquated Policies, and New Alternatives